Sharing is caring!

Adobe is struggling to fix as many security issues as possible, but it seems that it’s a never ending nightmare. The latest emergency software update that was released to the Flash plug-in fixed a “critical” vulnerability” that could allow hacks to gain control of computers. Users are advised to download the new software patch as soon as possible, if they don’t want to take any risks.



Adobe Flash plug-in is compatible with browsers such as Internet Explorer and Google Chrome and it allows users to play video content embedded into websites. Its presence is not even noticed, as it runs in the background, without bothering other applications. But recently, hackers targeted a vulnerability called CVE-2015-3113, which has been discovered by Security website FireEye and which was actively exploited in the wild. Adobe reacted fast and released the software patch.

According to Erica Eng and Dan Caselden, who wrote on the company’s blog, there were sent malicious emails that “included links to compromised web servers that served either benign content or a malicious Adobe Flash Player file that exploits CVE-2015-3113.” Adobe acknowledged the issue and said in statement that the new patch “addresses a critical vulnerability (CVE-2015-3113) that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

It seems that the vulnerability is exploited via limited, targeted attacks and it affects Internet Explorer on computers running on Windows 7 and below, as well as Firefox on Windows XP.

The issue was classified as Priority 1 and it affected not only PCs running on Windows, but Mac and Linux as well, and it has to do with Adobe Flash Player 18.0.0.161 (Windows and Mac), Adobe Flash Player Extended Support Release version 13.0.0.292 and earlier 13.x versions (Windows and Mac) and Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.466 and earlier 11.x versions (Linux).

Users are advised to update to version 18.0.0.194 as soon as possible, which they can download from Adobe’s official website.

Every techie needs a pair of sick headphones. Neurogadget recommends these Audio Technica Professional Studio Monitor Headphones for both their quality and their cool-factor.