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On October 11, Adobe released a security update for their Flash Player. The update is meant to address a serious security flaw that could allow an attacker to take control of an affected system. The update was tagged as “critical” and it’s for users on Windows, Linux, ChromeOS and Mac.

These are the affected products along with their versions:

  • Adobe Flash Player Desktop Runtime – version 23.0.0.162 and earlier
  • Adobe Flash Player Extended Support Release – version 18.0.0.375 and earlier
  • Adobe Flash Player for Google Chrome – version 23.0.0.162 and earlier
  • Adobe Flash Player for Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer 11 – version 23.0.0.162 and earlier
  • Adobe Flash Player for Linux – version 11.2.202.635 and earlier

How to get the updates



  • Those who are using Adobe Flash Player Desktop Runtime can either use the update mechanism within the product or manually update it by visiting the Adobe Flash Player Download Center.
  • Those who are using Adobe Flash Player Extend Support can visit the Archived Flash Player versions for developer’s page on the official Adobe website.
  • Those who are using Adobe Flash Player for Linux should visit the Adobe Flash Player Download Center.
  • Those who are using Google Chrome will have their Flash Player updated with the latest Chrome version.
  • Those who are using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer for Windows 10 and 8.1 will have their Flash Player updated automatically.

Checking if updates were reflected

It’s important to verify if that update was successful. In order to know for sure, you have to check the version of the product. There are two ways to do that:

  1. Access the About Flash page
  2. Right-click on any running Flash content then choose “About Adobe (or Macromedia) Flash Player” from the menu.

Another important note: if you have multiple browsers in your system, you also have to make sure that they are updated as well.

With more and more are adopting HTML 5 to deliver content, it makes sense to wonder whether you should just abandon Flash completely. However, it’s worth noting that there are still some that use Flash for content. The bottom line is we just need to be vigilant and make products are always up to date.

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