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Adobe announced in June 2012 that Flash Player would no longer be available on Android devices, starting with its 4.1 version. And, many people in the tech industry wanted to find out what happened between Android and Adobe that would result in this situation.

The Theories Behind Adobe’s Demise With Android

There were a number of theories.

One of the more popular theories was that Apple was behind the breakup after Steve Jobs shared his “Thoughts on Flash” article with Adobe. In the letter, he states that he wouldn’t be using Flash on the company’s iPhones or iPads because it didn’t meet the requirements for the times.



However, both Mozilla and Google have announced they would be blocking the once-popular player, starting in 2017. And, again, questions are asked as to why this is. Did Jobs really have a part in Adobe’s future with other tech companies?

Jobs did make a few good points. For instance, the Internet is and is always changing. Developers would rather use a universal coding language that doesn’t need the assistance of plugins and works on an array of devices. It’s why HTML5 coding has seen its popularity increase.

On top of that, the digital population’s mobile habits are changing because there’s an increasing trend of being dependent on apps…not just websites. People want convenience and an improved touch-based interface like tablets and smartphones.

Of course, there are other reasons for Adobe/Android’s breakup. One problem stemmed from Flash needing to support an array of operating systems; Android is used in a plethora of hardware with various software versions. Adobe may have decided it was too many resources being used and wanted to put their attention on other projects.

Not Completely “Divorced”

Still, Adobe and Android haven’t cut all ties together. For instance, Adobe AIR still has similar technologies as Flash. Developers can use it on Flash-based products while using AIR to develop apps for Android devices as well as Windows, Mac and iOS.

And, for people who use Android but still want Flash, there are some third-party browsers that offer Flash Player content in them.

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