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As we all know, Apple released iOS 9.3.1 to fix some issues that were found in iOS 9.3, one of which was a bug that caused apps or even the entire device to crash or freeze whenever users clicked a link in Safari and other apps. iOS 9.3.1 did fix the bugs, but many iOS device users were worried that it would also fix the vulnerabilities that jailbreaking teams are using to create a jailbreaking tool for iOS 9.3.

Fortunately, as Redmond Pie reports, this isn’t the case since iOS 9.3 and iOS 9.3.1 are still on the same level in terms of security. This means that, if hackers are using certain vulnerability in iOS 9.3 to create a jailbreaking tool, this vulnerability is still present in iOS 9.3.1. So, a jailbreaking tool that’s made for iOS 9.3 will most likely work for iOS 9.3.1, too.



“But are these firmware really jailbreakable?” iOS device users may ask. “Or are their defenses too tough for hackers to break through?” Well, Apple does take security very seriously and has designed their latest firmware to be impervious to security threats. However, independent hackers have shown that this isn’t entirely true. One example is renowned hacker Luca Todesco (aka “qwertyoruiop” on Twitter), who has released a video showing that he was able to jailbreak an Apple device that was running on the fifth beta of iOS 9.3. Todesco doesn’t have any plans to reveal his process, but the fact that he was successful means that it is possible to jailbreak iOS 9.3 and iOS 9.3.1.

Fake Jailbreaking Tools

Despite this good news, Apple device owners shouldn’t download the first jailbreaking tools they see. There have been reports that fake jailbreaking tools are floating around the web and transferring malware to users’ smartphones or tablets when downloaded. To avoid getting a virus on their device, iOS users should only download a jailbreaking tool from dependable hacking teams like Pangu and TaiG.

Alternative to iOS 9.3.1 Jailbreak

Those who can’t wait for the iOS 9.3.1 jailbreaking tool to be released can opt to download an app-based installer called Mojo. It contains large amounts of content that are similar to those found in Cydia, and the best part about it is that it doesn’t require you to jailbreak your device. Granted, it doesn’t provide you the same level of freedom that jailbreaking provides, but it’s a great way to personalize your phone or tablet while waiting for an official breaking tool to be released.

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