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Dr. Richard Marks, the head of the PlayStation Magic Lab at Sony, had a presentation at the 2016 Vision VR/AR Summit, where he talked about the upcoming PlayStation VR headset, which is expected to have a 100 degree FOV and a latency of 19 ms. Regarding the PS4 console, Marks said that the device is more efficient than computers when it comes to processing VR content.



According to developer yantraVR, the PlayStation VR headset will work with the PS4 console and it’s “extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/a gtx970 based on the tests I’ve done . . . In brief, the PSVR only requires about 1/4th of the render target size that the Vive requires. This has a lot to do with the display they are using that can run a 60Hz game at 120Hz (in addition to the 90Hz mode).”

In his presentation, the developer talked also about the PS4 console, which is effectively 60 percent more efficient than computers with same specs, at handling VR processing. “For example, the draw calls on the PS4 are faster than with dx11 which is something that a lot of people don’t realize,” said the developer of the PlayStation VR headset. Back in December 2015, Mark didn’t have a great onstage demo of the PlayStation VR headset, because the controllers failed to work when two players were supposed to duel one another. The snafu was addressed at this time at the Vision VR/AR Summit that took place from 10 to 11 February.

On March 15, Sony will hold a press event and will talk more about the PlayStation VR headset. Most likely, the company will announce the price and release date for this device, and the fans will probably have the possibility to watch the press event live.

The Oculus Rift and HTC Vive will start being available for direct purchase from March 28 and early April, so this is the perfect moment for Sony to unveil the capabilities of its upcoming VR headset.

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