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It’s almost the end of February, but if you haven’t installed Adobe’s latest updates to Flash, Photoshop CC, Bridge CC, Connect and Experience Manager, then you should know that they bring many fixes for security issues that have been reported by the users. Yes, Adobe is extending its agony, before the Flash Player will finally succumb, but until then, enjoy the latest 22 security updates that have received severity rating.

Flash Player and AIR



The 20.0.0.306 version for Mac and the 11.2.202.569 version for Linux have brought 14 fixed for memory corruption vulnerabilities, which were allowing hackers to execute code on machines and take control of them. Besides the six use-after-free vulnerabilities, Adobe has also fixed a heap buffer overflow vulnerability, as well as a type confusion vulnerability. At the same time, Adobe has updated AIR to version 20.0.0.260 and these security patches have been integrated into it.

Photoshop and Bridge

There were three security issues related to memory corruption which have been identified in Photoshop and Bridge and they allowed hackers to execute code on the targeted devices. Francis Provencher, member of the COSIG, was the one who discovered these bugs, after finding another memory corruption issue in the Malwarebytes Anti-Malware software, last December. Now, the users can install the safe versions 16.1.2 (2015.1.2) and 15.2.4 (2014.2.4) of Photoshop CC and version 6.2 of Bridge CC.

Adobe Connect

Adobe’s video conferencing program, Adobe Connect, has been updated to version 9.5.2, which brought fixes for three security issues, as well as a new feature that protects users against Cross-Site Request Forgery attacks.

Adobe Experience Manager

This is a Java-based CMS bought by Adobe in 2010, which was previously named as CQ5 or Communique5. Adobe has brought four security hotfixes for the following versions: 6.1.0, 6.0.0 and 5.6.1, and they are protecting the users against a CSRF bug, URL filter bypass vulnerability, a Java deserialization issue and a problem related to information disclosure.

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