Whether you’ve received it already or are just now getting the notification to update your Flash Player, you shouldn’t be delaying it any further, Flash updates are critical and most of them solve issues which are so problematic that if you knew about them, you’d probably not have installed Flash in the first place.

From minor security breaches which let hackers know where you are to major ones which provide them with complete access of your computer, Flash has been the center of criticism and updates since its inception.

Flash Update to v21.0.0.182 (10th of March)

As a matter of fact, the endless updates which are necessary for Flash have caused the automatic update feature to become a norm, so that updates are delivered directly to our computers instead of through notifications on websites, all users have to do now is simply click the “install” button when they receive the notification (usually after you turn on your computer).

The March update which takes Flash to version 21.0.0.182 solved some security vulnerabilities, the complete details of which can be found on Adobe’s website over here but fear not, we’re going to be summarizing it for you.

Solving quite a few code injection vulnerabilities, it’s no news that these updates are fairly common for Flash, after all, the application is capable of doing so much on your computer that any vulnerability needs to be fixed quickly, Flash is present on pretty much every personal computer so even a small security risk might leave hundreds of thousands of computers vulnerable.

These updates are usually delivered automatically for users who’ve chosen to receive them upon their first installation, the settings can be changed via settings. On the other hand, Microsoft also pushed the update through Windows Update, where as Google Chrome users have been receiving them automatically without the need to approve them.

Users who haven’t received the update should download the latest Flash version directly from Adobe’s website, here’s a link to save you some time, we recommend that you turn on automatic Flash updates if you plan on using the Adobe Flash Player since it’s always better to be safe than sorry, it’s not likely that you fall victim to one of these security vulnerabilities since most of them require you to be the target of someone’s malicious intention.

Most of these updates are aimed at government organizations, major firms and corporations, since targeting a single individual requires a significant time investment from a hacker, it’s simply not worth it, that’s no reason to not update though, updates usually take only a couple of minutes and can protect you from major security and privacy risks.